Alkaline Phosphatase

The alkaline phosphatase test (ALP) is used to help detect liver disease or bone disorders. In conditions affecting the liver, damaged liver cells release increased amounts of ALP into the blood. This test is often used to detect blocked bile ducts because ALP is especially high in the edges of cells that join to form bile ducts. If one or more of them are obstructed, for example by a tumor, then blood levels of ALP will often be high.

ALT (SGPT)

The alanine aminotransferase (ALT) blood test is typically used to detect liver injury. It is often ordered in conjunction with aspartate aminotransferase (AST) or as part of a liver panel to screen for and/or help diagnose liver disease. AST and ALT are considered to be two of the most important tests to detect liver injury, although ALT is more specific than AST. Sometimes AST is compared directly to ALT and an AST/ALT ratio is calculated. This ratio may be used to distinguish between different causes of liver damage.

AST (SGOT)

The blood test for aspartate aminotransferase (AST) is usually used to detect liver damage. It is often ordered in conjunction with another liver enzyme, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), or as part of a liver panel to screen for and/or help diagnose liver disorders. AST and ALT are considered to be two of the most important tests to detect liver injury, although ALT is more specific than AST. Sometimes AST is compared directly to ALT and an AST/ALT ratio is calculated. This ratio may be used to distinguish between different causes of liver damage. AST levels are often compared with results of other tests, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total protein, andbilirubin to help determine which form of liver disease is present. AST is often measured to monitor treatment of persons with liver disease and may be ordered either by itself or along with other tests for this purpose. Sometimes AST may be used to monitor people who are taking medications that are potentially toxic to the liver. If AST levels increase, then the person may be switched to another medication.

Bilirubin, Total

When bilirubin levels are high, a condition called jaundice occurs, and further testing is needed to determine the cause. Too much bilirubin may mean that too much is being produced (usually due to increased hemolysis) or that the liver is incapable of adequately removing bilirubin in a timely manner due to blockage of bile ducts, liver diseases such as cirrhosis, acute hepatitis, or inherited problems with bilirubin processing. In adults or older children, bilirubin is measured to diagnose and/or monitor liver diseases, such as cirrhosis, hepatitis, or gallstones. Patients with sickle cell disease or other causes of hemolytic anemia may have episodes where excessive RBC destruction takes place, increasing bilirubin levels.

Gamma GT

Gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) levels may be used to determine the cause of an elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Both ALP and GGT are elevated in disease of the bile ducts and in some liver diseases, but only ALP will be elevated in bone disease. If the GGT level is normal in a person with a high ALP, the cause is most likely bone disease. The GGT test is sometimes used to help detect liver disease and bile duct obstructions. It is usually ordered in conjunction with or as follow up to other liver tests such as ALT, AST, ALP, and bilirubin. Increased levels of GGT levels may indicate in general that the liver is being damaged but does not specifically point to a condition that may be causing the injury. While elevated GGT levels may be caused by liver disease, they may also be caused by alcohol consumption and/or other conditions, such as congestive heart failure.